Spring 1961 • Vol. XXIII No. 2 Department KR: A Section of Briefer Comment |

Just an Impression

There sat the diplomat-poet, as cool as water, and four scientists on the carpeted stage of the concert house, in front of the King of Sweden and 2000 guests of Stockholm and surrounded by 80 or so Ibsen-browed, sturdily sincere members of the Swedish Academy. The poet caught the eye. He sat with knees crossed, left hand stroking his mustache, looking a little musty around the shoulders of his well-used coat and tails as various members of the Academy arose, related the achievements of the five men and asked them, one by one, to take their Nobel prizes from the hands of the King. There followed, each time, some hushed and awkward moments. Came the poet's turn. St.-John Perse descended the steps of the stage and approached warm-hearted Gustav VI Adolf, two inches taller than the poet, who leaned over, grasped the poet's hand, and spoke to him privately. There was a moment then, fine as glass, while the King went on speaking to a man who seemed used to being spoken to by kings, both h

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There sat the diplomat-poet, as cool as water, and four scientists on the carpeted stage of the concert house, in front of the King of Sweden and 2000 guests of […]

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There sat the diplomat-poet, as cool as water, and four scientists on the carpeted stage of the concert house, in front of the King of Sweden and 2000 guests of […]

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