Spring 1960 • Vol. XXII No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1960 |

Standpoint

A curious, and rather anachronistic, discussion has occured in the past month or two—people in London and New York have been talking about a short story, and talking about it as intently and seriously as if it were an article by Edmund Wilson or George Kennan. The story, called "The Trial Begins", is by a young Soviet writer whose pseudonym is "Adam Tertz", and it appeared in the January number of Encounter. Even though much of the talk has been devoted to questioning or defending the story's authenticity or to its reflection of Soviet life today, the question of its literary merit has had attention, too. For a moment, it seems almost unbelievable that anyone should care that much about a piece of fiction, new fiction. Short stories, when they are read at all these days, are read hastily and indifferently by a few people. They are often considered a device that serves to keep the cartoon section of The New Yorker from running into the advertisements or, in the reviews, as a br

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Standpoint

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A curious, and rather anachronistic, discussion has occured in the past month or two—people in London and New York have been talking about a short story, and talking about it […]

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A curious, and rather anachronistic, discussion has occured in the past month or two—people in London and New York have been talking about a short story, and talking about it […]

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