Spring 1959 • Vol. XXI No. 2 Nonfiction |

Personalism and the Wilderness

The United States has a magazine called The Personalist and American university campuses are peopled annually with more and more students having some knowledge of personalism as a philosophical movement related (sometimes by alliance and sometimes by opposition) to various forms of philosophy known loosely as "existential." Yet the relevance of a personalist philosophy to the American ethos or the conditions for making such a philosophy viable in the American climate are by no means clear. Material on which to ground a judgment concerning these matters is difficult to come by. One cannot simply ask whether Americans like a personalist philosophy. It is necessary to have some evidence as to what they would do with it, how the American ethos could set itself in active relationship to such philosophy, what facets of the American character such a philosophy would engage, and what the end result on the American character would be. Material which certainly makes it possible to treat su

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Forster’s Symbolic Form

By Glenn Pedersen

The United States has a magazine called The Personalist and American university campuses are peopled annually with more and more students having some knowledge of personalism as a philosophical movement […]

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