Spring 1958 • Vol. XX No. 2 Nonfiction |

Theatre Letter I

Once again, there is a slightly second-hand look about the New York theatrical scene. At least, most of the plays that have drawn me to the theater this year are importations, adaptations or revivals. Of the plays from England, John Osborne's Look Back in Anger rode in on a sustained drum-roll of Angry Young Man publicity. It is primarily a play about the dissolution and tentative resurrection of Jimmy Porter's marriage. The protagonist's need to prove to himself, to his wife, to his friend, Cliff, that he is not the cipher that he imagines his world has made of them all ("I suppose people of our generation aren't able to die for good causes any longer. We had all that done for us, in the Thirties and the Forties, when we were still kids") forces him to make a victim of his wife. The stick with which he beats her is the fact that he comes of working-class parents, that he has known hunger and suffering intimately and that she has been sheltered by her middle-class family. On sta

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Theatre Letter

By Gerald Weales

Once again, there is a slightly second-hand look about the New York theatrical scene. At least, most of the plays that have drawn me to the theater this year are […]

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