Spring 1958 • Vol. XX No. 2 Book ReviewsApril 1, 1958 |

Joyce on Joyce

In the days of his eminence, T. S. Eliot has become one of the most indefatigable preface-writers—"prefateers" Joyce might have called them—of a passing generation. One frequently feels that in this role Mr. Eliot is performing a social rather than a purely literary function. The feeling is pronounced in reading his preface to My Brother's Keeper—a party at which Eliot, "fascinated and repelled by the personality" of Stanislaus Joyce, is little at home, and from which, after speaking a few cautious words, he makes his departure with a marked sense of relief. "This one book," he remarks in parting, "is worthy to occupy a permanent place on the bookshelf beside the works of his brother." The only work of his brother's to which Stanislaus Joyce's memoir might be compared is Stephen Hero, a work which Joyce later in life moodily looked back on as an adolescent indiscretion. Like that early manuscript, the present memoir, published posthumously, is crude and impassioned, exhibi

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Baudelaire Revisited

By Vivian Mercier

In the days of his eminence, T. S. Eliot has become one of the most indefatigable preface-writers—"prefateers" Joyce might have called them—of a passing generation. One frequently feels that in […]

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