Spring 1956 • Vol. XVIII No. 2 Book Reviews |

Musical Performance

There is a record of a rehearsal at the 1950 Prades Festival in which Casals stops to explain to the orchestra: "Every note is variety—this is what gives life—otherwise it's something dry. And it is fascinating to hear him achieve with the orchestra the enlivening inflection of melodic phrase and accompanying figuration that makes the Prades Festival performances of Bach so extraordinary. The principle that Casals states to the orchestra he also illustrates in his own playing of the cello. The record of the rehearsal is included as a bonus in the volume of 1951 Perpignan Festival performances of chamber music of Beethoven (Columbia SL-169); and in the performance of the great Archduke Trio one hears an impressive demonstration of the exciting life that Casales creates in music with the bold inflections and distentions of his powerfully sustained tone in powerfully sustained phrasing. String tone lends itself to sustained phrasing; not so piano tone, which begins to die o

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Concerning Opera

By B. H. Haggin

There is a record of a rehearsal at the 1950 Prades Festival in which Casals stops to explain to the orchestra: "Every note is variety—this is what gives life—otherwise it's […]

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