Spring 1953 • Vol. XV No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1953 |

Theatre Letter

Aristotle, as we know him, has interfered with my enjoyment of the theatre this half-season. I can't help taking an extensive scholarly and critical apparatus to the theatre with me, and the prospect of seeing Jean-Louis Barrault's repertoire and the Greek National Theatre sorely tempted me to let the apparatus do all the work. Surrender to the apparatus, however, has been widespread and I am no longer so hard on the "Broadway Intelligentsia" that reacts profoundly to half-baked poetic philosophy, liberal platitudes, flashy production tricks, and the agonized soul-play of the Stanislavsky "Method." What I do despair of is the literate audience that never sees the performance on the stage at all. Both groups come ready equipped to understand the meaning of the play and to be moved, no matter what the correspondence between the interpretation on the stage and the ideas in their heads. This blind but willing readiness might well be identified as the "ritual expectancy" Francis Fergusso

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Aristotle, as we know him, has interfered with my enjoyment of the theatre this half-season. I can't help taking an extensive scholarly and critical apparatus to the theatre with me, […]

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Aristotle, as we know him, has interfered with my enjoyment of the theatre this half-season. I can't help taking an extensive scholarly and critical apparatus to the theatre with me, […]

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