Spring 1951 • Vol. XIII No. 2 Nonfiction |

Three Definitions

The first of the definitions to be offered here is the broadest. It concerns "the lyric" in general. The second will deal with "the Platonic dialogue," considered as a literary species. It is built around the examination of Plato's dialogues alone: but because the form has been so often followed to varying degrees by other writers, the definition bears upon a field much wider than the works of Plato on which it was based. The third will be the narrowest. It was designed solely to provide a formula for Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. This single work was considered somewhat "angelically," as a kind all by itself. (We say "angelically," thinking of Aquinas' doctrine that each individual angel is a distinct species, and the only member of its kind.) But though we treat the work as sui generis, we necessarily define it in terms of some classification. Tentatively, we propose "lyric novel" as the generic name for this work, considered as a species. The prototype of such de

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Four Master Tropes

By Kenneth Burke

The first of the definitions to be offered here is the broadest. It concerns "the lyric" in general. The second will deal with "the Platonic dialogue," considered as a literary […]

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