Spring 1950 • Vol. XII No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1950 |

The Theatre and Its Instrument

Translated from the French.  When at the age of six I dreamt of nothing but theatre I devoted my time to disguising myself and acting, quite alone. I imitated what I found around me. My joy was to become someone else and to provide things with a soul— the wind, my grandfather, my dog. All had, equally, a human life, a human soul. When at sixteen I rushed off to all the theatres indiscriminately and at every opportunity, it was the theatrical event that excited me. I simply sought to feel that collective communion which is performance. At bottom, what did the actors matter? It was theatre I was after. At last at twenty, when I decided both to stop dreaming of theatre and to start making theatre, I gave myself up body and goods and soul and chattels to Charles Dullin.' My one dream was to act like him. That is, I knew the joy of receiving, giving, exchanging, of being active, the actor's joy. Charles Dullin opened me up, formed my taste, and it was from this moment tha

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Communication

By Jacques Barzun

Translated from the French.  When at the age of six I dreamt of nothing but theatre I devoted my time to disguising myself and acting, quite alone. I imitated what […]

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