Spring 1950 • Vol. XII No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1950 |

Malraux’s Aesthetic

Undoubtedly there will be a great deal of critical effort exercised in assimilating this extraordinary book to André Malraux's previous writing and to his career. It need only be said here that there is no radical disjunction between The Psychology of Art1 and the Malraux who is familiar to us. The last page of Man's Hope delivers the subject which these volumes develop, at the moment when Manuel, withdrawn for the moment from battle, listens to some records of Beethoven symphonies and hears for the first time "… the voice of that which is more awe-inspiring even than the blood of men, more enigmatic even than their presence on earth—the infinite possibilities of their destiny." In The Psychology of Art, Malraux has chosen to explore this intimation by a passionate analysis of the essential nature and function of the plastic arts. He has invoked a style which is obviously calculated to the heroism of his enterprise, a prolonged, intense rhapsody which, though it sometimes threa

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Albert Camus

By Kermit Lansner

Undoubtedly there will be a great deal of critical effort exercised in assimilating this extraordinary book to André Malraux's previous writing and to his career. It need only be said […]

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