Spring 1950 • Vol. XII No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1950 |

An Explication of the Player’s Speech¹

(Hamlet, II, ii, 472-541)  1  The rugged Pyrrhus, he whose sable arms,  2  Black as his purpose, did the night resemble  3  When he lay couched in the ominous horse,  4  Hath now this dread and black complexion smear'd  5  With heraldry more dismal. Head to foot  6  Now is he total gules, horridly trick'd  7  With blood of fathers, mothers, daughters, sons,  8  Bak'd and impasted with the parching streets,  9  That lend a tyrannous and a damned light 10  To their lord's murther. Roasted in wrath and fire, 11  And thus o'ersized with coagulate gore, 12  With eyes like carbuncles, the hellish Pyrrhus 13  Old grandsire Priam seeks.… Anon he finds him,14  Striking too short at Greeks. His antique sword, 15  Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, 16  Repugnant to command. Unequal match'd, 17  Pyrrhus at Priam drives, in rage strikes wide; 18  But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword 19  Th'unnerved father falls. Then

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Wonderland Revisited

By Harry Levin

(Hamlet, II, ii, 472-541)  1  The rugged Pyrrhus, he whose sable arms,  2  Black as his purpose, did the night resemble  3  When he lay couched in the ominous horse, […]

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