Spring 1949 • Vol. XI No. 2 Book Reviews |

Aesthetics without Experience

Insight And Outlook by Arthur Koestler. Macmillan. Having written superior journalism and middling fiction, Arthur Koestler comes to us now as something of a theoretical scientist and aesthetician with the publication of the first volume of a work in bisociative psychology. His purpose is to construct a theory of mental process which will account for all creative activity and apply to scientific discovery and the comic as special cases. He begins with an analysis of jokes, many of them taken from Wit and its Relation to the Unconscious to facilitate comparison of his theory with Freud's. There would appear to be little chance of a radically new theory of the comic. All theories, in describing what takes place in the course of a joke, invariably touch on the "surprise element," the sudden, incongruous shift from one plane of meaning or expectation to another. Once the description is given, it serves also as the complete explanation—unless the comic is included under some la

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A Farewell to Hemingway

By Isaac Rosenfeld

Insight And Outlook by Arthur Koestler. Macmillan. Having written superior journalism and middling fiction, Arthur Koestler comes to us now as something of a theoretical scientist and aesthetician with the […]

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