Spring 1947 • Vol. IX No. 2 Nonfiction |

Toward a Definition of Cultural Crisis

In recent years, the word "crisis" has been on everybody's lips, but there has been little attempt to analyze its meaning. Since so important a concept requires clarification, the present article is an attempt to clarify its import. Although I shall seek to define the general meaning of cultural crisis, I shall use as illustration mainly the contemporary word crisis, partly because it is a good example and partly because it is of intense concern to us today. I assume that it is unnecessary to argue that the world is in a state of crisis, and that the time of danger and tribulation through which we have been living did not suddenly terminate with the capitulation of the Axis. When in the present context I speak of a "culture," I am employing the term as the anthropologist customarily employs is as denoting not just a few of the activities of a society but the entire range of its activities, conceived as a more or less systematic whole. In employing "culture" in this sense, I do n

Already have an account? Login

Join KR for even more to read.

Register for a free account to read five free pieces a month from our current issue and digital archive.
Register for Free and Read This Piece



Or become a subscriber today and get complete, immediate access to our digital archives at every subscription level.

Read More

Marsden Hartley

By Hudson D. Walker

In recent years, the word "crisis" has been on everybody's lips, but there has been little attempt to analyze its meaning. Since so important a concept requires clarification, the present […]

Subscribe

Your free registration with Kenyon review incudes access to exclusive content, early access to program registration, and more.

Donate

With your support, we’ll continue 
to cultivate talent and publish extraordinary literature from diverse voices around the world.