Spring 1947 • Vol. IX No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1947 |

Movie Letter

The mechanization of Hollywood aesthetics continues at an undiminished rate of speed. All the movies of the past months firmly reassert the factory principle that the standard article is inexhaustibly protean: a contradiction in terms, to be sure, but a paradox natural to an art in which anything goes so long as the theatres are filled. In New York they are definitely being filled while admission prices reach their highest peak in history. Even a recent innovation, the psychiatric film, draws dutifully on the time-proven stereotypes. Film dreams are becoming more and more spectacular, offering a plausible opportunity for the dance spectacle, which sometimes derives both décor and choreography, as in Yolanda and the Thief, from Surrealism. Salvador Dali provided "ideas" for the dream sequence in Spellbound, wherein, although not taking the form of a dance spectacle, part of the dream was a sort of ski race; that is, an "athletic" event. Naturally both individual psychiatrists and ps

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Lust for Lifelikeness

By Parker Tyler

The mechanization of Hollywood aesthetics continues at an undiminished rate of speed. All the movies of the past months firmly reassert the factory principle that the standard article is inexhaustibly […]

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