Spring 1947 • Vol. IX No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1947 |

Marsden Hartley

Marsden Hartley, nearly four years after his death, is a controversial figure in the development of American painting. Estimates vary between the contention that he did not know how to paint, and the assertion that he approached Winslow Homer in originality and power. These diverse opinions have been expressed by two museum directors, equally respected in the field of contemporary American art. I had the privilege of knowing Hartley well the last six years of his life, and during the past ten years have seen the bulk of drawings, lithographs, pastels and paintings which he produced. No doubt remains in my mind that Hartley was a great American painter. Alfred Stieglitz gave Hartley his first one-man exhibition at "291" (Fifth Avenue) in 1909, when the artist was 31. He exhibited a series of Maine landscapes, depicting hillsides at various seasons of the year. Although he had studied in the Chase School, the influences evident in his earliest work are Segantini and Twachtman. The

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Movie Letter

By Parker Tyler

Marsden Hartley, nearly four years after his death, is a controversial figure in the development of American painting. Estimates vary between the contention that he did not know how to […]

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