Spring 1947 • Vol. IX No. 2 NonfictionApril 1, 1947 |

L’Homme Est Une Passion Inutile: Sartre and Heidegger

The "stages on life's way" as Kierkegaard describes them are, first and last, steps in a pilgrimage from the world to God: it is the ultimate confrontation of the individual with his maker that motivates and directs the journey. Only to find God could one relinquish the brightness of things seen for the dark despair of the mind turned in upon itself; only to find God could one renounce the splendid dream-palaces of speculative fancy for the cramped quarters of one's tortured solitary self. But in view of Sartre and, by Sartre's account, of Heidegger, it is the very denial of God's existence, not the search for him, that makes the inner odyssey of the self seeking the self philosophy's primary concern. The concept of a human nature, which existentialism rejects, is, as Sartre sees it, a by-product of the traditional idea of God; and conversely, when God dies, the notion of an essence of humanity dies with him, leaving just these particular histories of these particular selves to

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The Philosophy

By Marjorie Grene

The "stages on life's way" as Kierkegaard describes them are, first and last, steps in a pilgrimage from the world to God: it is the ultimate confrontation of the individual with […]

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