Spring 1947 • Vol. IX No. 2 Fiction |

Allegiance

"Come in." And: "Of course I remember you and knew I should the moment your voice came drawling on the wire." The first one, two, three, four steps I take across the room are taken with trepidation. And, so to speak, in mid air. I am afraid that I shall yield, for even at her age the old creature is still a great beauty. And there is about her, after all, that charm which has long been discredited in my mind. As she rings for tea I perceive that in her simplest gestures, in her smile, even in her old-lady dress there is that fascination about her which we, who knew her as children, have remembered as her "romantic quality." I discover in an instant that we have been mistaken to suppose her romantic quality was either vulgar ostentation or mere shallow vanity. And now that she is before me I know that I do not remember her, for herself, at all. "I remember you so well, dear child, in your blue and red rompers and of course those fearful black stockings your mother would have

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U.S. short-story writer, novelist, and playwright Peter Taylor (1917-1994) focused his works in the urban South. He taught at Kenyon College and the University of Virginia after studying under critics Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom. His novel A Summons to Memphis (1986) won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and his collection The Old Forest and Other Stories (1985) won the PEN/Faulkner Award. He is best known for his short stories which mainly take place in contemporary Tennessee.

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Cousin Aubrey

By Peter Taylor

"Come in." And: "Of course I remember you and knew I should the moment your voice came drawling on the wire." The first one, two, three, four steps I take […]

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