Spring 1945 • Vol. VII No. 2 Book Reviews |

Inversions on a Formula

Road To The Ocean by Leonid Leonov. Translated by Norbert Guterman. L. B. Fischer. $3.00. Like Turgeniev, Leonov would probably be surprised to find himself excoriated by the (anti-Stalinist) Left and embraced by the literary Right. American critics seem agreed that this Soviet writer was trying to write a "social" novel on the order of Malraux or Dos Passos—though "it is painful," added some, "to see him working so hard, only to surrender his story to the Soviet formula." But Leonov has no message to offer except the truism that poetry cannot live with politics. It is at once apparent from his tone, containing both irony and humility, and his full comprehension of his people and his special tenderness for the casualties of Revolution, that he will not be content with any political formula. It soon becomes obvious, too, that no social "realism," however grotesquely punctuated, will be able to confine his Gogolian view of life as an illogical comedy, played in the dark by a set

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Some Culled Fictions

By Marjorie Farber

Road To The Ocean by Leonid Leonov. Translated by Norbert Guterman. L. B. Fischer. $3.00. Like Turgeniev, Leonov would probably be surprised to find himself excoriated by the (anti-Stalinist) Left […]

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