Spring 1939 • Vol. I No. 2 Book Reviews |

The Quality of Man

Man's Hope. By André Malraux. Translated from the French by Stuart Gilbert and Alastair Macdonald. Random House. $2.50 To say that Man’s Hope is not a novel in the traditional sense is not to question that it is a significant work of art. It belongs to some intermediate literary type which is coming into being under the pressure of contemporary subject-matter and the contemporary spirit. The case is all the more impressive in view of the fact that, in Man’s Fate, in Days of Wrath, in The Conquerors and in The Royal Way, Malraux has expertly employed the devices of fiction as they were developed by a long line of novelists, French, Russian and English. Above all in Man’s Fate he is master of what we may call the psychological close-up, of what James calls the “constituted occasion” or “scene,” of all that makes for intimacy and immediacy. This means that, along with fact and idea, he has been at least equally concerned with illusion, the framed and calcium-lighted i

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Malentendu

By Joseph Warren Beach

Man's Hope. By André Malraux. Translated from the French by Stuart Gilbert and Alastair Macdonald. Random House. $2.50 To say that Man’s Hope is not a novel in the traditional […]

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