Spring 1939 • Vol. I No. 2 Book ReviewsApril 1, 1939 |

About Dancers

Artists of the Dance. By Lillian Moore. Thomas Y. Crowell. $3.50 Miss Moore is a dancer and hence writes about dancers from a sensible point of view. She has agglomerated a considerable amount of material which is not readily available from other sources. While not bearing the burden of an overhanging scholarship, her historical tracing is careful and correct, and she writes in an easy style that will unquestionably satisfy a large public of dancers. The pictures are not very well produced, nor indeed well placed, as portraits belong to one article have a way of turning up in another. The book is full of curious information. For example, we learn Taglioni’s arms were so long that her clever father invented poses to make them look shorter, and these poses of the overlapping hands at once became an academic standard position for all dancing schools. However, there is in this modest work no attempt at psychological generalization, nor classification of dancers’ taste or gifts

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Stage and Film

By Gilbert Seldes

Artists of the Dance. By Lillian Moore. Thomas Y. Crowell. $3.50 Miss Moore is a dancer and hence writes about dancers from a sensible point of view. She has agglomerated […]

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