The Kenyon Review Developmental Editing Fellowship for Emerging Writers is designed to nurture and develop new voices in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. The fellowship will provide support for emerging writers who demonstrate exceptional talent, promise, and commitment to their chosen craft. Participation in the program involves one-on-one mentorship by an experienced editor on the KR team over a period of four months. Fellows can expect to have monthly hour-long conversations with a Developmental Editor, who will provide feedback and suggestions on a book draft. 

Announcing the 2024 Developmental Editing Fellows

We are pleased to announce the 2024 Developmental Editing Fellows. From over seven hundred applications for the fellowship, we selected fellows in three genres: in fiction, Hilary Sun will work with Associate Editor Sergei Lobanov-Rostovsky on Lateral Curvatures, a novel; in nonfiction, Edmée Lepercq will work with Senior Editor Katharine Weber on Germination Protocol, an essay collection; and in poetry, Logan Klutse will work with Editor Nicole Terez Dutton on “For an Eye”: The Intersections of Medical Malpractice, West African Immigrant Patients, and Black Diasporic Faith Practices, a book of poetry. These writers will receive one-on-one mentorship and editorial attention for their works in progress over a period of four months. Learn more about the fellows below.

2024 Fellow in Fiction: Hilary Sun, for “Lateral Curvatures”

Photo of Hilary Sun

Hilary Sun (she/her) is a disabled Chinese American writer. She was a 2023 Asian American Writers’ Workshop Margins Fellow and a Millay Arts resident. Her work can be found in The Adroit JournalThe Rumpus, and The Ending Hasn’t Happened Yet (Sable Books, 2022).

2024 Fellow in Nonfiction: Edmée Lepercq, for “Germination Protocol”

Photo of Edmée Lepercq

Edmée Lepercq is a writer and critic based in London. Her essays have appeared in Orion and the Ilanot Review. Her criticism has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of BooksArtforum, and the British Journal of Photography, among others. She holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars. 

2024 Fellow in Poetry: Logan Klutse, for “’For an Eye’: The Intersections of Medical Malpractice, West African Immigrant Patients, and Black Diasporic Faith Practices””

Photo of Logan Klutse

Logan Klutse is a poet and playwright from Lakewood, Colorado, whose work has appeared in PloughsharesFeral: A Journal of Poetry and Art, and as part of exhibitions at the Yale University Art Gallery. He recently graduated from Yale University with B.A.s in English and Theater Studies, and has received support from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, scholarships from the Tin House Summer Workshop, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and the Community of Writers, and fellowships from the Gordon Grand Fund, the Richter Fund, and the Michael Manzella Foundation. He is currently a 2023–24 Gordon Grand Postgraduate Fellow working on his next play and debut poetry manuscript.

Eligibility

  • Applicants must be twenty-one years of age or older.
  • This fellowship opportunity is open to any writer who is not currently enrolled in a degree-granting creative writing program.
  • Applicants should not have published a full-length literary book with a major publisher, university press, or other established press, or be under contract for a book. Published work in literary magazines or journals is acceptable.
  • Writers from communities that are traditionally underrepresented in the publishing industry are especially encouraged to apply.

Application

  • Submit between September 15 and November 1, 2023
  • Include…
    • a project description (max 500 words). Please note any challenges or particular areas of concern within the work.
    • a poetry or prose writing sample of the project. The writing sample should be 10–15 pages (double spaced for fiction and nonfiction).
    • a recent copy of your CV.
  • The application fee is $18. If this fee poses a hardship, please contact us at kenyonreview@kenyon.edu. 
  • All fee-paying applicants are invited to claim a complimentary half-year Print plus Digital subscription toThe Kenyon Review (for domestic addresses) or a half-year digital subscription (for international addresses) through November 15, 2023.

Selection Process

Our Developmental Editors (members of the KR editorial team) will review the applications and select the Fellows they will work with. They will reach out to the Fellow and arrange for an initial conversation by phone or Zoom. Fellows and Developmental Editors will collaborate on a work plan, establish goals, and determine deadlines and a schedule for monthly hour-long conversations. Over the course of four months, they will meet by phone or Zoom to discuss the progress of the writing project. Winners will be announced in early 2024. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Eligibility

Who is eligible for this fellowship? 

Writers who are at least twenty-one years old and not currently enrolled in a degree-granting creative writing program and who have not yet published full-length volumes of literature are eligible. 

What if I have a BA in creative writing or am currently enrolled in a BA program in creative writing? 

If you received a BA in creative writing, you are eligible. If you are currently enrolled in a degree granting creative writing program (BA, BFA, MFA, or PhD), you are not eligible.

I am not a US citizen. Am I eligible to apply? 

Yes. 

Are MFA candidates eligible for this fellowship? 

No, writers who are currently enrolled in an MFA program are not eligible for this fellowship. 

If I have completed an MFA program, am I eligible to apply? 

Yes, we welcome writers who have previously completed an MFA program. 

Am I eligible if I am WAY over twenty-one? 

Yes. 

Am I eligible if I am currently enrolled in (or a graduate of) a graduate program that isn’t in creative writing? 

Yes. 

If I’ve published a chapbook, am I eligible? 

Yes. 

If I’ve published three chapbooks, am I eligible? 

Yes!

If I’ve published a cookbook or a chapter in a textbook, am I eligible? 

Yes. As long as you have not published a full-length volume of poetry or prose, you are eligible. 

If I’ve self-published full length volumes, am I eligible? 

No.

Application Process

How do I apply? 

Using Submittable, please submit a narrative of a project in process (500 word maximum, and please note any challenges or particular areas of concern within the work); a poetry or prose writing sample of the project, 10–15 pages (double spaced for fiction and nonfiction); a recent copy of your CV; and the $18 application fee. All fee-paying applicants are invited to claim a half-year subscription to The Kenyon Review by November 15, 2023. 

When can I apply? 

We are accepting applications from September 15 until November 1, 2023. 

How much does it cost to apply? 

The application fee is $18. All fee-paying applicants are invited to claim a half-year subscription to The Kenyon Review by November 15, 2023. If this fee poses a hardship, please contact us at kenyonreview@kenyon.edu and we will work with you. 

When will winners be announced? 

Early 2024.

The Fellowship

What is a developmental editing fellowship? 

Writers may use these months to work with editors to expand and revise their work. Our Developmental Editors will review and select the writers they will work with. They will reach out to the writer and arrange for an initial conversation by phone or Zoom. Writers and Developmental Editors will collaborate on a work plan, establish goals and determine deadlines and a schedule for monthly hour-long conversations. Over the course of four months they will meet by phone or Zoom to discuss the progress of the writing project. 

So the fellowship is to learn developmental editing? 

No, the fellowship is meant to support emerging writers with developmental editing as they expand and revise a current writing project. 

How often will writers communicate with the editor? 

Fellows can expect to have monthly hour-long conversations by phone or Zoom with an Editor who will provide feedback and suggestions on the draft. 

How long does the fellowship last? 

Four months. 

When will the developmental fellowship run? 

February to April.

Testimonials

“I had a great experience working with Brandon on my manuscript. He helped me find a more coherent sequence to my book, gave me feedback on individual poems, and even inspired me to generate new work.… Brandon and I are also both new parents, and we spent a lot of time talking about how being a parent has changed us as poets, and how much poetry there is in parenthood.… He listened, sympathized, and did such close readings of my work. In the throes of being a new mom, there were so many moments where the poet in me felt erased. My meetings with Brandon were the much-needed reminder that that poet in me is still very much alive and I’m not alone in trying to balance the love for my art and my son! I’m so grateful for this mentorship and for the opportunity to work with Brandon. It was truly a gift.”

—Allison Albino, 2021 Fellow in Poetry

“This fellowship was an incredible gift that feels like a turning point for my writing. It came at just the right moment, as I was digging into a nonfiction project about restlessness and ADHD. My mentor, Jerald Walker, was a close reader and generous listener. I’m especially grateful for his perspective on storytelling and scene development, since I’m a writer who leans toward (or even hides in) poetry and metaphor. He challenged me to rethink when and how I engage metaphor, and my nonfiction feels more vivid, clear, and honest because of it.… The fellowship also brought the shape of my project into focus.… It felt like Jerald was dreaming with me about what this might become.… For me, the fellowship felt like the equivalent of a semester in an MFA program, but with the bonus of working entirely one-on-one with Jerald. I received extensive feedback, grew my reading list, tried new techniques, generated new material, and revised (and revised and revised).… Many, many thanks to The Kenyon Review and Jerald for this gift!”

—Emily Stoddard, 2021 Fellow in Nonfiction

“I arrived at my first fellowship meeting with a fractured story made up of a million half-baked ideas and half-finished drafts of chapters. I was also without any sort of traditional literary background: no MFA or creative writing or English degree, no published work, no writing community. I departed, a mere four months later, with a wealth of instruction and insight from my incredible mentor, a newfound resolve and confidence in my work, and a completed first draft of the novel I’ve been dreaming of writing for years. The fellowship provided the rigor and accountability I needed to turn out pages, as well as the space and encouragement I needed to fill them with work I was challenged by and am proud of. The Kenyon Review was incredibly supportive throughout the process and I could not be more grateful to have had the opportunity to be championed by an institution I so respect and admire.”

—Jane Walton, 2021 Fellow in Fiction

Past Developmental Editing Fellows

2021 Fellow in Fiction: Jane Walton, for “No Fury”

Jane Walton is a writer from Mississippi. She holds an MA in Journalism from the University of Mississippi and is the Communications Director of a legal advocacy nonprofit.

2021 Fellow in Nonfiction: Emily Stoddard, for “Good Dog”

Emily Stoddard is a poet and writer in Michigan. Her writing appears in Tupelo Quarterly, Baltimore Review, Ruminate, Radar, Tinderbox Poetry Journal, Cold Mountain Review, Whitefish Review, and elsewhere. As a leader of the Amherst Writers & Artists Method, she founded Voice & Vessel, a studio that supports fellow writers. More at www.emilystoddard.com.

2021 Fellow in Poetry: Allison Albino, for “My Mother’s Prufrock”

Allison Albino is a Filipina-American poet and French teacher who lives and writes in Harlem. Her work has either appeared or is forthcoming in Narrative, the Rumpus, Lantern Review, Poetry Northwest, the Oxford Review of Books, the Alaska Quarterly Reviews, the Common, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from The Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, The Fine Arts Work Center and Tin House. She studied creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College and has an MA in French literature from NYU. She teaches at The Dalton School in New York City.

Developmental Editors

2021 Developmental Editor in Fiction

Geeta Kothari is a senior editor at the Kenyon Review. She is a co-founder of the www.novelworkshop.org (formerly Kenyon Review Novel Workshop). Her writing has appeared in various anthologies and journals, including New England Review, Massachusetts Review, and others.

2021 Developmental Editor in Nonfiction

Along with the memoirs Street Shadows and The World in Flames, Jerald Walker is the author of How to Make a Slave and Other Essays, a 2020 Finalist for the National Book Award in Nonfiction. His work has appeared in publications such as Harvard Review, Creative Nonfiction, Iowa Review, and Mother Jones, and it has been widely anthologized, including five times in The Best American Essays series. A recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship and a Pushcart Prize, Walker is a professor of creative writing and African American literature at Emerson College.

2021 Developmental Editor in Poetry

Brandon Som is the author of The Tribute Horse (Nightboat Books), winner of the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and the chapbook Babel’s Moon (Tupelo Press), winner of the Snowbound Prize. He has received fellowships from the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, Civitella Ranieri, and Lighthouse Works. He currently teaches in the literature department at the University of California, San Diego.

The Kenyon Review Developmental Editing Fellowship for Emerging Writers is designed to nurture and develop new voices in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. It is designed to provide support for emerging writers who demonstrate exceptional talent, promise, and commitment to their chosen craft.